Golden Gate Park (Middle)


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For a summary of park features with point-by-point locations, see the Golden Gate Park guide map. See also Historic Images and Postcards.

Now: Lakes, meadows, and wooded paths stretching over a good portion of Golden Gate Park's length, the middle section has some of the most tranquil and secluded areas in the park.

Then: Most of the lakes in the park, including the lush Stow Lake, did not exist at all before the creation of the park. The entrace way columns of a Nob Hill residence destroyed in the 1906 earthquake and fire were transported to the park as the Portals of the Past monument, at Lloyd Lake.

How To Get There: The middle section is accessible directly via 19th Avenue, which intersects with MLK Drive on the south side and Cross Over Drive on the north. 25th Avenue also has traffic entrances on both the north and south sides. Parking along Fulton Street is easy along the middle Avenues.

For much more information on Golden Gate Park, see Christopher Pollock's impeccably researched and beautifully written book, San Francisco's Golden Gate Park.


The little Fulton Playground, built in 1981, is just inside the park at 9th Avenue. You can walk from the playground to the Music Concourse through the pedestrian tunnel under JFK Drive.

  • Fulton Playground, near Fulton Street and 9th Avenue

  • Fulton Playground, facing southwest toward the DeYoung Museum and JFK Tunnel

  • Equipment in the Fulton Playground


South of the playground, the JFK Drive pedestrian tunnel was designed in 1896. Even something as utilitarian as a traffic bridge was undertaken with fantastic style by the park's builders.

  • Pedestrian Tunnel under JFK Drive, at the Fulton Playground

  • The top of the JFK Drive Pedestrian Tunnel, between 9th and 10th Avenue

  • Looking through the JFK Pedestrian Tunnel to the north toward Fulton Playground on the other side

  • Inside the JFK Pedestrian Tunnel

  • JFK Pedestrian Tunnel near the south exit to the Music Concourse area

  • South end of the JFK Pedestrian Tunnel, from the Music Concourse area


Developed for the 1894 Mid-Winter Fair, this concourse is now the heart of Golden Gate Park's "museum district". The Music Stand (aka Spreckels Temple of Music) at the west end of the concourse was completed in 1900, and still hosts music performances on Sundays. Many of the park's historically controversial statues are scattered in and around the concourse area. The Pool of Enchantment, originally installed in 1917 at the front of the DeYoung Museum, is now located (post-restoration) on its east side.

  • The Music Concourse, looking east

  • Garden of Enchantment, near the Music Concourse and DeYoung Museum

  • Pool of Enchantment, near the DeYoung Museum

  • Bronze sculptures inside cages near the Pool of Enchantment in the Music Concourse

  • Bronze sculptures in caged enclosures in the Music Concourse area near JFK Drive

  • Dry fountain at the center of the Music Concourse

  • The Music Concourse area, from in front of the Academy of Sciences

  • Music Stand, also known as Spreckels Temple of Music, in the Music Concourse

  • Audience listening to a performance at the Music Stand

  • Junipero Serra Monument was installed in 1907, near the northeast entrance to the Music Concourse

  • Francis Scott Key Monument, originally installed near the location of the Tennis Courts in 1888

  • The Francis Scott Key Monument, installed the Music Concourse in 1977, is seen in early images of the park in its previous location

  • Apple Cider Press statue, sculpted in 1892 and located in the Music Concourse

  • The bronze Lion Statue, a gift from Shreve and Company jewelers, dates back to 1906

  • Roman Gladiator Sculpture, made in 1881

  • Miguel de Cervantes monument, near the northeast entrance to the Music Concourse

  • Bronze vase created by Paul Gustave Dore in 1878

  • Detail of the Dore Vase, in the Music Concourse

  • Concrete sphinxes marking the entryway to the DeYoung Museum, since 1928

  • Entrance to the underground parking garage at Fulton and 10th Avenue

  • Entrance to the underground parking garage at 10th Avenue and Fulton Street


Founded in 1895 as the Memorial Museum, and renamed as the DeYoung in 1924 after the San Francisco Chronicle publisher who had guided its development. The original structure was built in Egyptian style. The museum was completely rebuilt and re-opened in 2005. Exhibitions of art and historic artifacts are featured. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 9:30am to 5:15pm. $10 regular adult admission. Entry to the observation tower is free. 415-750-3600. Website.

  • DeYoung Museum, on the north side of Museum Plaza

  • Inside the DeYoung Museum Observation Tower, looking north

  • Inside the DeYoung Observation Tower, looking south

  • Northeast view from the Observation Tower at the DeYoung Museum

  • North view from the DeYoung Observation Tower, including the Academy of Sciences Building

  • Northwest view from the DeYoung Observation Tower, including the Music Stand


Originally opening in Golden Gate Park in 1916, the facility later came to include the Steinhart Aquarium (1923), the African Hall (with dioramas), Science Hall, and Morrison Planetarium. Entire generations of children visited on field trips. Completely demolished and rebuilt, the new Academy of Sciences opened in 2008. It now includes the downstairs aquarium, penguins and displays from the African Hall on the ground floor, the rainforest dome, and the living roof. Open Monday through Saturday 9:30am to 5:00pm, and Sunday 11:00am to 5:00pm. $24.95 regular adult admission. Thursday nights 6:00pm to 10:00pm, adults 21+ only ($12). 415-379-8000. Website.

  • Front of the Academy of Sciences Building

  • Inside the front lobby of the Academy of Sciences building

  • Dining tables outside the back of the Academy of Sciences

  • The Rainforest Dome, inside the Academy of Sciences

  • Inside the Rainforest Dome, from the upper level

  • Observing butterflies at the top of the Rainforest Dome

  • Butterflies in the top level of the Rainforest Dome

  • Inside the Rainforest dome, looking down at part of the aquarium from above

  • Walkway below the same section of aquarium

  • Visitors watching the aquarium

  • The east section of the Academy of Sciences

  • On the roof of the Academy of Sciences, at the above the Rainforest Dome

  • Center of the living roof at the Academy of Sciences

  • Visitors on the observation deck of the living roof

  • The DeYoung Museum, viewed from the roof of the Academy of Sciences


Established in 1928, this formal garden features plants and flowers mentioned in Shakespeare's writings. The garden's marble bench was added in 1929. The iron entrance gate was added during a renovation in 1991. It's located just south of the Academy of Sciences.

  • Entrance to the Shakespeare Garden, from MLK Drive

  • Entrance gate to the Shakespeare Garden

  • Blossoms on the trees in the Shakespeare Garden in the spring

  • Shakespeare Garden, from above

  • Bench inside the Shakespare Garden

  • Detail of marble bench inside the Shakespare Garden

  • The Shakespeare Garden

  • East wall inside the Shakespeare Garden

  • The bust of Shakespeare is locked behind the steel doors in the wall at the end of the Shakespeare Garden


Two back-to-back baseball diamonds on an incredibly large stretch of lawn. This patch of green stands out clearly when looking down at the park from the vantage point of Grand View Park in Golden Gate Heights. Two indoor handball courts are situated just north of the Big Rec Fields, off of Middle Drive East. On the east side of the handball courts, a path leads up toward the DeLaveaga Dell/AIDS Memorial Grove. Two rings of stones, possibly headstone pieces, lie embedded in a clearing around a tree on the path south of Middle Drive East. The ball fields are available for reservation. 415-831-5510.

  • Entrance to the Big Recreation Fields and Handball Courts, from Middle Drive East

  • Handball Courts, just north of the Big Rec Fields

  • Path around the Handball Courts at the Big Rec Field

  • Big Rec Ball Field, at the edge of Lincoln Avenue at 7th Avenue

  • Looking south toward Lincoln Avenue from the playing field at 7th Avenue

  • South view from the Big Rec Field

  • The two baseball fields in the Big Rec area, from the south side

  • Ball players on the west side of the Big Rec Ball Field

  • A ball game in progress at the east side of the Big Rec Ball Field

  • Walking path along the east side of the Big Rec Ball Field

  • Path from the Handball Courts and Big Rec Field toward the AIDS Memorial Grove

  • Park entrance at 7th Avenue and Lincoln Way, at the Big Rec Ball Field


Tranquil grove of coastal redwoods, surrounding a granite rock inscribed with the names of local casualties of World War I. Paths lead from the Rose Garden through this wooded area to the Music Concourse entrance at 10th Avenue. The grove was dedicated in 1919, and the memorial rock was added in 1932. The entrances are easy to miss, and most visitors pass by on JFK Drive without noticing this part of the park.

  • Entrance to the Heroes Grove from JFK Drive near the DeYoung Museum

  • Walking path inside the Heroes Grove

  • Wooded area west of the monument in Heroes Grove

  • Trees in the Heroes Grove

  • Gold Star Mothers Rock, at the center of Heroes Grove

  • Gold Star Mothers Rock, inscribed with names of WW1 casualties


Dating to 1894, this garden's current beautiful state belies a turbulent political history. The Hagiwara family, original caretakers of the garden, were evicted and sent to an internment camp during World War II. Until 1952, the garden was called Oriental Tea Garden, removing the reference to its Japanese origin. Open daily 9:00am to 6:00pm (March-October), 9:00am to 4:45pm (November-February). $5 adult admission ($7 non-SF residents). Free entry before 10am Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 415-666-3232. Website.

  • Entrance to the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Lantern dedicated to the Japanese pioneers

  • Plaque at the lantern dedicated to Japanese pioneers

  • Hours posted for the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Admission prices for the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Japanese Tea Garden near the entrance

  • Tables in the Japanese Tea Garden where tea is served

  • Decorative archway and pagoda inside the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Detail of the pagoda in the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Pagoda inside the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Lake and Moon Bridge inside Japanese Tea Garden

  • Moon Bridge inside the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Stone pathway across a pond in the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Peace Lantern, in the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Buddha in the Japanese Tea Garden dates back to 1790

  • Path inside the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Walking path in the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Cement lantern in the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Pond inside the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Pond inside the Japanese Tea Garden with Koi fish

  • Koi fish in the pond at the Japanese Tea Garden

  • People taking pictures at the curved bridge in the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Inside the ornamental archway in the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Detail of the ornamental arch in the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Blossoms on the trees in the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Grass at the corner of the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Rear exit from the Japanese Tea Garden, near the Friend Gate to the Botanical Garden and entrance to Stow Lake


This building sits at the main entrance to the Botanical Garden on 9th Avenue near Lincoln Way. It was dedicated in 1960 and was intended as a hall of flowers - a display area for indoor specimens. It now hosts expositions and public events.

  • Sign on the San Francisco County Fair Building, at 9th Avenue near Lincoln Way

  • Outside of the San Francisco County Fair Building

  • Courtyard at the entrance to the San Francisco County Fair Building


This vast 55-acre collection of geographically themed gardens offers the opportunity to see (and learn the names of) plant specimens from all over the world. It also features some of the most charming walking paths and grassy picnic areas in all of Golden Gate Park. Gates are open 8:00am to 4:30pm weekdays, 10:00am to 5:00pm weekends. Free admission. Free guided walks daily at 1:30pm. 415-661-1316. Website.

  • Main entrance to the Botanical Garden, near 9th Avenue

  • Bookstore at the main entrance to the Botanical Garden

  • Inside the Botanical Garden

  • Walking paths inside the Botanical Garden, near the east entrance

  • Looking back toward the main entrance from inside the Botanical Garden

  • Walkway and pagoda in the Garden of Fragrance area of the Botanical Garden

  • Mexican Bell, made in 1847 and brought from Mexico

  • Steps leading up a hill at the Garden of Fragrance

  • View of walking paths from hill in the Botanical Garden

  • Information about plant types in the Botanical Garden

  • Wooden walkway in the north section of the Botanical Garden

  • Inside the Botanical Garden, near the Friend Gate

  • The Succulent Garden inside the Botanical Garden

  • Clearing west of the Moon Viewing Garden

  • Bridge near the Moon Viewing Garden inside the Botanical Garden

  • The Moon Viewing Garden, inside the Botanical Garden

  • Path near California Natives section inside Botanical Garden

  • California Redwoods inside the Botanical Garden

  • Redwood Nature Trail, inside the Botanical Garden

  • Bamboo grove near south edge of Botanical Garden

  • Carved inscriptions on Bamboo stalks

  • Pond inside the Botanical Garden near the Friend Gate

  • Botanical Garden map on display near the Friend Gate on the north side

  • The Friend Gate entrance to the Botanical Garden, from MLK Drive


Developed in 1961, this garden is situated between the Park Presidio Boulevard Entrance at Fulton Street and JFK Drive, just west of the Music Concourse. Roses in red, pink, yellow, and orange manage to survive despite the park's frequent foggy days, and are in full bloom during late summer.

  • The Rose Garden, just west of the museum

  • The Rose Garden

  • Inside the Rose Garden

  • Path in the Rose Garden

  • Roses in the garden

  • The Rose Garden, looking south toward JFK Drive

  • Roses near the Fulton Street entrance to the Rose Garden

  • Rose Garden entrance at Fulton Street

  • Clearing west of the Rose Garden


The meadow adjacent to this grove and the Doughboy Statue with laurel wreath are easy to notice while passing by on JFK Drive, but the redwood grove itself is visited less often. The trees were planted in 1930 in honor of war casualties, and have since grown enough to create a dense, shady grove.

  • Doughboy Statue at the Redwood Memorial Grove

  • Meadow on the east side of the Redwood Memorial Grove

  • Inside the Redwood Memorial Grove, on the north side of JFK Drive from the Colonial Historic Trees


Planted in 1896, this grove includes a tree for each of the 13 Colonies. Each tree is a different type, native to the area it represents. The gently sloping meadow and ring of trees create a tempting vista when you're passing by on JFK Drive. The bizarre Pioneer Mother Statue also tends to call attention, and is rumored to be a creepy sight on foggy nights.

  • Colonial Historic Trees, just south of JFK Drive and north of Stow Lake

  • The grove of Colonial Historic Trees

  • Lawn at the Colonial Historic Trees

  • West view from under one of the trees in the Colonial Historic grove

  • Boulder and plaque at the Colonial Historic Trees

  • Bench at the Colonial Historic Trees, facing east

  • Pioneer Mother statue, from the Colonial Historic Trees

  • Pioneer Mother Statue, the work of Charles Grafly, 1915

  • Detail of the Pioneer Mother statue

  • Bench at the meadow near the Colonial Historic Trees

  • The Colonial Historic Trees in March

  • Willis Polk Rock, near the Colonial Historic Trees and Pioneer Log Cabin


Constructed in 1911 from redwood logs (floated down in the form of a raft down the coast from Humboldt County), to honor the pioneer women of California. The cabin now houses the Permits Division of the Park Department.

  • Path leading to the Pioneer Log Cabin

  • Pioneer Log Cabin, west of the Colonial Historic Trees

  • Permits office, located in the Pioneer Log Cabin


Named for the colored lights that originally framed the falls at their dedication in 1930, this is the second of two artificial waterfall systems created in Golden Gate Park (the other being Huntington Falls in Stow Lake). Water is pumped from nearby Lloyd Lake, and circulated in the trench stream along JFK Drive. The very top of the falls is enclosed by fences, so no vantage point looking down over the cascade is possible.

  • Rainbow Falls, looking up toward Prayer Book Cross, at JFK Drive near Crossover Drive

  • Rainbow Falls and Lagoon

  • Full view of Rainbow Falls, from the lagoon

  • Rainbow Falls, from a near vantage point

  • Bottom of the cascade at Rainbow Falls

  • Part of the rock wall of the cove where Rainbow Falls in located


The Prayerbook Cross near the top of the falls is another 1894 relic, and may be reached via a trail up the hill. In early photos, the cross is seen clearly on the hill (and is referred to as "Drake's Cross". Full grown trees now hide the cross almost completely from street level. At 64 feet, it is the tallest monument in the park.

  • Sign marking the entrance to the trail leading up to Prayerbook Cross, from JFK Drive

  • Prayerbook Cross, at the top of Rainbow Falls near JFK Drive

  • Prayerbook Cross, from a close vantage point


A landscaping masterpiece, it's very hard to believe that this lake was built from nothing. Finished in 1893, this quintessential feature of Golden Gate Park was a featured part of the 1894 Midwinter Fair. The lake itself forms a ring around Strawberry Hill, with three smaller islands in the lake for wildlife habitation. Two bridges connect the outside shore of the lake to Strawberry Hill. At the northwest corner of Stow Lake, boat rentals are available at the front entrance, bicycles and surreys at the back. 415-752-0347.

  • Strawberry Hill and the Chinese Pavilion from the edge of Stow Lake

  • Stow Lake and Chinese Pavilion

  • Chinese Pavilion and Huntington Falls, seen from the outer banks of Stow Lake

  • Stow Lake and Strawberry Hill, from the south shore

  • Stow Lake, looking south toward Strawberry Hill

  • Stow Lake and Rustic Bridge, near Martin Luther King Jr Drive and Crossover Drive

  • Looking south toward Sutro Tower from the east shore of Stow Lake

  • Bench on the outer shore of the east area of Stow Lake

  • Stow Lake, near Rustic Bridge

  • Boats on Stow Lake

  • Path around the outer bank of Stow Lake

  • Iceplants and reeds along the inner shore of Stow Lake near the Rustic Bridge

  • Wildlife nesting island in east area of Stow Lake near Huntington Falls

  • View of the Boat Dock at Stow Lake

  • Empty Pedal Boats at Stow Lake

  • Snack Bar and Boat Rentals on the north side of Stow Lake

  • Bike and Surry Rentals, at the back of the Boat House on the north side of Stow Lake

  • Front of Surrey Quadricycle at rental area

  • Picnic Area at the northwest side of Stow Lake, near the Bike Rental area

  • Path to the north area of Stow Lake from JFK Drive near Rainbow Falls

  • Sign marking the path to Stow Lake from JFK Drive near the Colonial Historic Trees

  • Path leading to Stow Lake from JFK Drive near the Pioneer Log Cabin

  • Flowers in the path leading to Stow Lake from JFK Drive near the Pioneer Log Cabin

  • East entrance to Stow Lake, from the stairs near the exit from the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Path leading to Stow Lake from the rear exit of the Japanese Tea Garden

  • Stairway leading up to Stow Lake from the path at the Tea Garden exit

  • Steps leading up to Stow Lake from MLK Drive


The plain Roman Bridge and its counterpart, the rocky Rustic Bridge, both date to 1893.

  • Entrance to the Roman Bridge from the outer shore of Stow Lake

  • The Roman Bridge, connecting Strawberry Hill with the Stow Lake perimeter

  • Stow Lake and Roman Bridge in the north area of Stow Lake


The Rustic Bridge and Roman Bridge were both completed in time for the 1894 Midwinter Fair. Then, as now, they allow pedestrians to walk from the outer shore of Stow Lake to the island of Strawberry Hill, and boats to travel underneath.

  • Rustic Bridge from the outer shore of Stow Lake

  • The edge of Rustic Bridge, from the west side

  • Rustic Bridge, from the inner shore of Stow Lake at Strawberry Hill

  • Top of the Rustic Bridge, looking toward Strawberry Hill

  • Under the Rustic Bridge, on the surface of Stow Lake

  • The Rustic Bridge, reflected in Stow Lake


The island hill, the highest point in Golden Gate Park, is surrounded by Stow Lake. Paths lead around the perimeter of the hill, and steps lead up the west and east sides. Sweeney Observatory, a castle-like concrete structure sat atop the hill from 1891 to 1906, when it was ruined in the earthquake.

  • Strawberry Hill, from the west side of Stow Lake

  • Steps leading up to the top of Strawberry Hill

  • Reservoir at the top of Strawberry Hill

  • Path at the top of Strawberry Hill, facing east

  • Looking down at Stow Lake from the top of Strawberry Hill

  • The top of Strawberry Hill

  • Possibly part of the foundation of Sweeney Observatory, at the top of Strawberry Hill

  • Looking up at Strawberry Hill, from its north perimeter

  • Path leading up Strawberry Hill, on the west side


Huntington Falls was inspired by a visit John McLaren made to the Sierras with naturalist John Muir. The sculpted rocks around the falls look a little theme park-ish, but it's no less scenic when you're climbing the adjacent stairs.

  • Huntington Falls, from the bottom of Strawberry Hill

  • Huntington Falls, from a rock near the top

  • Looking down over the top of Huntington Falls at Strawberry Hill


This structure was a gift from San Francisco's sister city, Taipei, and was dedicated in 1981.

  • The Chinese Pavilion, on the inner shore of Stow Lake

  • Chinese Pavilion at the foot of Strawberry Hill

  • Detail of a column on the Chinese Pavilion Structure at Stow Lake

  • Small pond on the south side of the Chinese Pavilion at Stow Lake

  • Side of the Chinese Pavilion, from inside

  • Bridge at the Chinese Pavilion near the edge of Strawberry Hill and Stow Lake


It's hard to miss this meadow from MLK Drive, as it's a strikingly large patch of relatively flat grass. There are trees around the perimeter, but the lawn itself is wide open. A playground sits in the back, and paths on the east and west side connect with Stow Lake.

  • Path leading to Mothers Meadow and Playground from MLK Drive

  • Mothers Meadow at MLK Drive near 18th Avenue

  • Stump near the entrance to Mothers Meadow from MLK Drive

  • The field at Mothers Meadow, facing north

  • Playground in Mothers Meadow

  • The playground at Mothers Meadow


More vehicle traffic passes through this gate at 19th Avenue and Lincoln Way than any other entry point to the park. The pillars were a gift from a wealthy family and were dedicated in 1923.

  • Breon Gate, at the 19th Avenue entrance to the park

  • Column of the Breon Gate at 19th Avenue and Lincoln Way

  • Inscription on the column of Breon Gate, dating to 1924


This well-named road consists of four traffic lanes slicing through the middle of the park from south to north. At JFK Drive it literally crosses over via traffic bridge and then splits toward 25th Avenue to the west and Park Presidio Boulevard to the east. It's bascially the main way to drive through the park if your intent is to get to the other side without stopping.

  • The Crossover Drive traffic bridge over JFK Drive

  • Cars entering the south side of the park at 19th Avenue

  • Intersection of Crossover Drive and Park Presidio


Parallel to Crossover Drive, Transverse is the road you take if you want to travel north-south without leaving the park. It's also a great relatively quiet street to park on with access to the middle section of the park.

  • Transverse Drive, south of Overlook Drive

  • Transverse Drive near the path leading to Elk Glen Lake

  • Blossoms on the plum trees along Transverse Drive, near Elk Glen Lake


Middle Drive East and West are two parts of a road travelling east-west through the middle of the park. The west section is closed to through traffic and one portion south of Speedway Meadow is blocked off as a bicycle training area.

  • Middle Drive West closed south of Speedway Meadow for designated bicycle training area

  • Middle Drive West, closed to traffic

  • Purple brush plants near Middle Drive West


This is the reservoir for the water pumped up its adjacent hill to Rainbow Falls. The water is circulated via the JFK Drive stream, and pours back into the lake in a cascade at its southwest corner. A trail entrance from Transverse Drive leads up the hill overlooking the water. The lake itself has a placid, dreamlike quality due in part to the stately presence of the Portals of the Past. It was also previously referred to as Mirror Lake.

  • Overlooking the waterfall on the east side of Lloyd Lake

  • Waterfall at Lloyd Lake

  • Plaque at the waterfall on the east side of Lloyd Lake

  • View toward the waterfall from the east side of Lloyd Lake

  • Lloyd Lake and the waterfall

  • JFK Drive and Speedway Meadow, from the south shore of Lloyd Lake

  • Lloyd Lake from the hill between Transverse Drive and the lake

  • The north shore of Lloyd Lake

  • Pump house, behind the trees on the northeast shore of Lloyd Lake


Part of the entrance for a Nob Hill Mansion destroyed in the 1906 earthquake. The columns, left standing after the collapse of the house, were transported to the park and installed in 1909 as a memorial.

  • Portals of the Past monument to the 1906 earthquake

  • Looking up at the Portals of the Past, from inside the archway

  • One of the back columns on the Portals of the Past has crumbled

  • Another of the back columns on the Portals of the Past has been replaced

  • Corner of the Portals of the Past structure

  • Portals of the Past, from the path on the north side of Lloyd Lake

  • Portals of the Past and its reflection in Lloyd Lake

  • Lloyd Lake and Portals of the Past

  • Portals of the Past from the hill above Lloyd Lake


Created in 1936, this lake is adorned by plum and cherry trees on its east side, and surrounded by wild grasses that grow high in the early spring. Its location deep in the middle of Golden Gate Park, and the fact that no major road passes its shore, makes this one of the most hidden and seldom-visited features of the park.

  • Elk Glen Lake, off of MLK Drive

  • Elk Glen Lake, from the north shore

  • The south shore of Elk Glen Lake

  • Elk Glen Lake, facing east

  • Ducks on the shore of Elk Glen Lake

  • Looking west over Elk Glen Lake

  • Grassy hillside on the north shore of Elk Glen Lake

  • Willows at Elk Glen Lake

  • Fruit tree at the shore of Elk Glen Lake

  • Cherry Trees on the east side of Elk Glen Lake

  • Tree near Elk Glen Lake

  • Blossoms on the cherry trees at Elk Glen Lake

  • Path leading away from the north side of Elk Glen Lake

  • Path near Elk Glen Lake and the Urban Forestry Center

  • Twisted tree on the path leading west from Elk Glen Lake


Planted in 1932, this grove was apparently meant to honor the 200th anniversary of George Washington's birth, not the bicentennial of US independence. The redwood tree dedicated to Herbert Hoover was planted in 1935, according to the plaque beneath it.

  • Facing out toward the walking path along MLK Drive from Washington Bicentennial Grove

  • Lawn at the Washington Bicentennial Grove

  • Blossoming trees in the Washington Bicentennial Grove at MLK Drive, just west of Transverse Drive

  • Herbert Hoover Tree at the Washington Bicentennial Grove

  • Plaque under the Herbert Hoover Tree at the Washington Bicentennial Grove

  • Meadow west of Crossover Drive (19th Avenue) and Lincoln Way, near the Washington Bicentennial Grove

  • Picic area and meadow near the 25th Avenue entrance to the park at Lincoln Way

  • North view across the meadow and picnic area toward MLK Drive

  • Maintenance mower on the meadow near Bicentennial Grove